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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 19: A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 – The Dream Child

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 19: A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 – The Dream Child

I love posters that are not photoshopped poses.  Many times, with the painted poster, or the artistic poster that truly was created by a person with talent, a person will talk about the image of the one-sheet many years after they’ve seen the film (or haven’t seen, as it were).

Some iconic posters over the years have been any poster from Saul Bass, Drew Struzan, Boris Vallejo, Richard Amsel, Bill Gold, and Anthony Goldschmidt.  The poster alone from any of these maestro’s would sell tickets to a movie, regardless the pic.

Sometimes it would be as great as the film.  Sometimes….the only good thing about the film.

Today is just one of those instances…

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 19: A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 – The Dream Child

nightmare_on_elm_street_fiveDirector: Stephen Hopkins
Year: 1989
Cast: Robert Englund, Lisa Wilcox, Kelly Jo Minter
Language: English
Country: USA
Specs: 89 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★★ / D

Freddy, in attempt to finally destroy Alice, begins to haunt her through the dreams of her unborn child, whom he hopes of possess, allowing for him to be reborn into the world.

What a mess.  The story makes little sense this time around.  Pointless elements that haven’t any justification, laughable makeup and special effects, zero scares, and the most inane one liners delivered from Freddy hitherto.  I actually think every sentence spoken from Freddy is a very UNFUNNY one liner.

Whereas the first and third film in this franchise had a reason, this iteration has no reason whatsoever why Freddy hunts and kills his victims.  The sound effects are completely amateurish sounding.  The film feels like a rejected “Puppet Master” film retooled to be a Freddy pic instead.

Nightmare 5 FoodyTo close it off, the end credits song is perhaps one of the worst songs ever to appear in a film.  Were they serious???

 
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Posted by on October 20, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 18: Silent Night, Deadly Night

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 18: Silent Night, Deadly Night

It was a swealtering summer night in the suburbs of my hometown.  My brother and I were spending another night with my cousin, looking forward to the traditional night of watching a double feature in the living room of his tiny downstair apartment.  We loved to stay the night, as my aunt seemed to have no qualms about the type of films we would be allowed to view.  Compared to my mothers restrictions on something as seemingly innocent as Strawberry Shortcake or The Care Bears, a film that featured any worldly vice or plot was like a trip to Fantasy Island.

This night, my cousin was ecstatic.  He had stated that he was a fan of both films on the bill, and was sure we would equally enjoy them.  We turned down all of the lights, grabbed our individual servings of Jiffy Pop, and sat down to watch the first of our VHS tapes that night.

Sleepaway Camp was the first feature.  The second feature was the film I chose tonight for this series on frightful films during the month of October.  I chose the film not because I remembered it as a classic, but because amazingly, I remembered nothing about either film prior to tonights viewing.  I simply remembered the title of the films, and have wanted to revisit them both since my days as a youth.

As I write this, I wish I could unremember once again.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 18: Silent Night, Deadly Night

Silent Night Deadly NightDirector: Charles E. Sellier Jr.
Year: 1984
Cast: Lilyan Chauvin, Gilmer McCormick, Toni Nero, Robert Brian Wilson
Language: English
Country: USA
Specs: 85 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★ / F

Years after witnessing the brutal murder of his parents, a young man goes on a murderous rampage, dressed as Santa, choosing those he deems as “Naughty” as his victims.

What the 7734 were they thinking?  My word, what a travesty.  There is nothing about this film that I found enjoyable, frightening, intriguing, or any other emotion other than belwilderment.  While I could remember nothing about the film (I must have blocked it from my memory upon my initial viewing), I was aware that it spawned 4 sequels.  How that happened is beyond me.

The film is a worthless slasher pic that was as painful to watch as Chinese Food by Alison Gold.  I would have enjoyed it more had I miraculously experienced a Stay Tuned moment and found myself one of the victims of Billy’s axe to the stomach.  The dialogue, acting, plot, deaths, costuming, sets, all are about as shallow as my toddlers swimming pool.

I understand that parents boycotted the film upon its initial release due to its subject matter of a killer Santa.  I would rather have picketed the bank that funded this mess for wasting peoples money on such dreck.

Killer SantaIf you are as wanton as the un jovial man in red, by all means, rush out and rent this stinker.  If you are of the same character as the family in the Saturday Night Live skit The Gross-Out Family, then ask for the collector’s DVD box set of this film for your Christmas gift.  Otherwise, save yourself the misery and rent Misery instead.  At least you’ll enjoy the maniac with an ax (or a hammer in the theatrical version) much more.

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 16: The Mummy

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 16: The Mummy

I often feel like the Gill- Man from Creature from the Black Lagoon got the shaft. Other than a pair of sequels in 1955 (Revenge of the Creature) and 1956 (The Creature Walks Among Us), the scaly monster from the deep has not been featured in any other films, other than The Monster Squad and Hotel Transylvania, since his initial unveiling.

Perhaps a television show called The Creature Diaries didn’t have quite the same ring as the CW’s sudser about another creature of the night? I’m guessing The Gurgling wouldn’t have appeared as menacing atop a poster hanging in the lobby of the local cineplex as another more lupine film from Joe Dante in 1981 did. Certainly, had Kevin Bacon wanted to team with Paul Verhoeven to give us The Hollow Thing from Deep Down in a Cove Somewhere in The Amazon, the marketing people would have shot it down in favor of their other 2000 film nobody saw (get it?!).

Today’s film, however, features a classic monster that hasn’t suffered the same fate as his green gilled partner in slime.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 16: The Mummy


Director: Terence Fisher
Year: 1959
Cast: Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Yvonne Furneaux
Language: English
Country: United Kingdom
Specs: 88 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating:
Rating: ★★★★★ / A

After being woken from years of hibernation within his tomb, mummified Egyptian high priest Karnak seeks out those responsible for his awakening, when they disturb the tomb of his lover and Princess, Ananka, to avenge their desecration.

The opening music is amazing, deep and resonating as the opening credits unfold. Composer Franz Reizenstein helped create an atmosphere of wonder, accompanied by the wonderful sets and wardrobe expected in a Hammer film.

I always appreciated when the classic monster films were period pieces, allowing for a more immersive tale of fantasy and intrigue. This film does not deter, nor does it disappoint.

There were some directorial decisions that I found jarring, such as the numerous fades to the next scene as someone is speaking, and wondered if I were missing some excised scene, or if my stream had hiccuped. Overall, however, the calibre of the story, acting, and scenery overcame any misgivings I may have had.


The action and the suspense are simply top-notch. Special-effects are also superb, bearing in mind the time in which they were made. Many elements of these Hammer films, in part due to its being set in the past, no doubt, are timeless, and hold up against any modern film in the same genre, often surpassing it in originality.

I recommend this film to any fan of the classic Universal monster films. I suggest this film to any fan of the other entries in Hammers stable of features. Lastly, I urge any fan of the more recent outings from Universal and Stephen Sommers to view this film immediately, lest the curse of Ananka fall on you.

By the way, for those keeping score, the films/tv shows mentioned in the exordium were The Vampire Diaries, The Howling, and The Hollow Man, natch.

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 15: Love at First Bite

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 15: Love at First Bite

When I was a child, I loved to visit my uncle and see what new toys he had acquired since my last visit.  Years before I knew who Ridley Scott or Sigorney Weaver was, he had a 18″ Alien action figure.  While I had dozens upon dozens of Luke Skywalkers, Darth Vaders, Stormtroopers and Snaggletooths, he was the only person I knew whose parents would spring for a Tie FIghter and Millenium Falcon.  However, with all the expensive, rare, and coveted toys that he had in his massive toy box, there was one gadget that he was in possession of that was a favorite of mine, The Laugh Bag.

The Laugh Bag was a small box within a small bag, no larger than my hand, which would produce an insanely annoying laugh with the simple press of a button.  We would press that button over and over, often walking around the basement mimicking the laugh ourselves, much to the consternation of my poor grandmother.

When I originally saw today’s film, I loved it for merely one reason.  There was a character in the film that had a memorable laugh, that I found to be equally as impressionable as my uncles giggle machine.

<span style=”color: red;”>31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 15: Love at First Bite</span>

love_at_first_biteDirector: Stan Dragoti
Year: 1979
Cast: George Hamilton, Susan Saint James, Richard Benjamin, Arte Johnson
Language: English
Country: United States
Specs: 94 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: PG
Rating: ★★★½ / C+

Having been evicted from his home in Transylvania, Count Dracula travels to New York, where he meets whom he believes to be his long lost love, Mina Harker, reincarnated.  As he pursues her, her former lover, a descendant of the famous Van Helsing, pursues the count.

Revisiting the film for the first time since I was a child, I only remembered that the film was a comedy.  If I were to be viewing the film for the first time, I may be surprised to find it as such at the beginning.  As the opening credits begin, a tech music track plays, giving the impression the film about to unroll is a film in the vein of The Lost Boys.  However, the moment we see Hamilton, accompanied by the overpowering sounds of howling wolves, and the line that he delivers, we know we are in for a film of a different genre entirely.

Within moments, I was shocked to see Hamilton looking pale, his bronzed skin nowhere in sight.  Johnson, as Renfeld, then delivers his memorable laugh, and the tone has been set.  There were a number of scenes in the film that were wonderfully crafted send ups, and others that were jovial attempts at juvenile humor.  The passage through customs was amongst the best, in pure Zucker Brothers fashion.  In fact, I was surprised that the film was not a product of the famous filmmakers (Kentucky Fried Movie, their first effort, preceded this film by 2 years).

Interesting of note, was the timeliness of the scene with Sherman Hemsley, especially since the newest Oxygen show on prosperity gospel preachers (Preachers of L.A.) has been in the news. I also enjoyed seeing Isabel Sanford make a cameo as the fiery judge!

Something I did not remember from my childhood, but became instantly evident upon viewing with my more mature eyes, was the tone of the films comedy.  The swinging 70s are on display in full form, with much of the humor focusing on sex and drug use.

Some of the humor was a bit stale, perhaps in part due to its overabundance of use numerous satires since.  There have been no shortage of send ups to films in the horror genre, even those that contain the count himself (Dracula Dead & Loving It).  While the film surely was no Young Frankenstein, it certainly was more entertaining than Saturday the 14th.  I’m glad I revisited this pic.  Perhaps you may enjoy doing the same…

 
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Posted by on October 15, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 14: The Conjuring

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 14: The Conjuring

Haunted houses.  They pepper the landscape as Halloween draws near.  Many festivals and campgrounds feature some form of the attraction, be it a walk-through, a car and rail, or a religious variant intent on scaring a customer into paradise.  When it comes to the celluloid variant, Hollywood is no different.

Sometimes, they combine a genuine tale of a ghostly abode with a possession film.  Thankfully, today’s film fits such a bill.

<span style=”color: red;”>31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 14: The Conjuring</span>

conjuring_ver2_xlgDirector: James Wan
Year: 2013
Cast: Patrick Wilson, Vera Farmiga, Ron Livingston, Lili Taylor
Country: United States
Specs: 112 mins. / Color / OAR 2.35.1 / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★★★★ / B+

From the opening moments of this film, I knew I was in for an immersive experience in which I would likely lose much sleep.  The music, excellently crafted, sets the tone for the film the moment the picture fades from black.  I instantly reached for my iPad to begin a second screen experience in order to see the credits of composer Joseph Bishara (Insidious, Insidious: Chapter 2) and cinematographer John R. Leonetti (Insidious, Insidious: Chapter 2, The Mask), whose camera work was beautifully haunting as well.

The editing, something I always notice, was superb.  Each scene is allowed to breath, only cutting when necessary, facilitating the eeriness necessary to amp the nerves of the viewer into the stratosphere.

That’s not to say the film was flawless.  There were certain story elements that I found baffling, such as the hidden room being the room that contains the heater to heat the house (they didn’t notice during their initial purchase that it appeared the house had no heater nor basement?)  However, the film was so excellently crafted that I was tempted to pause and watch an episode of Golden Girls every 20 minutes in order to take the edge off.  The unknown is always more tense than what we can see, hence the reason Hitchcock’s films were so suspenseful/successful.

IMG_6285.dng

Prepare the chamomile laced with Xanax.  Otherwise it’s bound to be a long night…

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 13: A Nightmare on Elm Street 4 – The Dream Master

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 13: A Nightmare on Elm Street 4 – The Dream Master

Every once in a while, it’s nice to return to a storied franchise to revisit characters you connected with in prior entries.  You enjoy the charisma that a certain actor or actress brought to a character, and hope that the filmmakers are able to catch lightning in a bottle, once again.

Sometimes, it doesn’t quite work that way.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 13: A Nightmare on Elm Street 4 – The Dream Master

nightmare_on_elm_street_four_xlgDirector: Renny Harlin
Year: 1988
Cast: Robert Englund, Rodney Eastman, Lisa Wilcox, Tuesday Knight
Country: United States
Specs: 93 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★★★ / C-

Freddy returns to torment the remaining survivors of The Dream Warriors, in hopes to eradicate them from ever having a chance to destroy him, once and for all.

For starters, the return of surviving characters from part 3, yet with the lead being recast from the perfect Patricia Arquette, is a drastic mistake.  Tuesday Knight’s portrayal of Kristen Parker simply lacks any charisma, and fails to explore any added dimensions.

The return of gratuitous and formulaic elements that are all too common in many slasher films are here, as is the absolutely groaning one liners from Freddy.  The fact that the bones of Freddy come back together by way of a dogs urine is reminiscent of the more ludicrous Friday the 13th sequels.

As with other entries in this franchise, they also forgo the continuity of the original and instead invent their own.  In the original, when Freddy kills someone, the effects are seen in their reality.  Not here.  Also, Freddy resorts to comical ways to kill people, instead of the straight finger blades in the original.

The acting is about as ham-fisted as they come.  The plot is rather predictable (the set up of the karate lesson in the beginning of the flick).  There is zero suspense nor frights.  Freddy is a laughable goof.  The dialogues from Freddy are unneeded.  The actions are just plain dumb (as Kristen burns in a bed of flames, everyone just sits and watches, instead of putting out the fire to prevent the house from burning down, let alone save a badly burned girl).

 
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Posted by on October 14, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 12: A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 12: A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

Friday the 13th VI: Jason Lives (1986) had He’s Back (Man Behind the Mask) from Alice Cooper, Pet Sematary (1989) had the Ramones song of the same name, Trick or Treat (1986) had an entire soundtrack, and today’s film had Dream Warriors by Dokken.  It was a good few years for fans of both metal and horror.  I hadn’t seen today’s film in many years, and hesitated revisiting a film that I had fond memories of.  As I committed to going through the Nightmare on Elm Street series for the weekend posts of this month long series, I had little choice.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 12: A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors

nightmare_on_elm_street_threeDirector: Chuck Russell
Year: 1987
Cast: Patricia Arquette, Laurence Fishburne, Heather Langenkamp, Robert Englund, Craig Wasson
Country: United States
Specs: 96 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★★★★ / B+

A group of youth learn to control their dreams in an effort to defeat serial killer Freddy Krueger once and for all.

A return to form, with plenty of very eery and freaky moments/atmosphere.  I love how we’ve returned to see dreams that we’ve all experienced (running and suddenly the ground is sludge and you cannot run while the bogey man chases you down!).  Very nice sound f/x and music.

Some of the acting is a bit over the top, particularly as they witness the death of the first boy.  Also, Freddy has become a bit more comical in this film, delivering some cheesy 80s one-liners.  Of course, in true horror film fashion, the ways that Freddy kills people gets more inventive and ridiculous from film to film, this film being no exception.

This well written and cleverly directed entry is actual suspenseful, and features some impressive special f/x, making this a smidgen more enjoyable than the original.  I’m guessing the fact that Frank Darabont was one of the screenwriters had much to do with that.

 
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Posted by on October 12, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 11: House of Dark Shadows

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 11:  House of Dark Shadows

As a young child, I would sit in front of the television, playing with my Imperious Leader, Ovion, and Daggit action figures as my father would watch The White Shadow. I remember my mother would also make comments about Dark Shadows, a soap opera that she enjoyed watching along with the likes of General Hospital and One Life to Live. I would often confuse the two well into my early adult years. It wasn’t until recently when I truly became aware of the distinction between the two. When Johnny Depp was announced as playing the star of the remake/reboot of today’s film and its universe, I moved to seek out the original to see exactly what Tim Burton was choosing to ape.

As an aside, I’m not sure, and I’ll save this for another day, why we keep getting comedic remakes of films that weren’t originally comedies. Who are they making these films for, the original audience? They’re bound to be disappointed. A new audience are less likely to have knowledge of the source material, thus entirely missing the satirical elements of the feature..

With that being said, onto today’s entry.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 11: House of Dark Shadows

house_of_dark_shadows_xlgDirector: Dan Curtis
Year: 1970
Cast: Jonathan Frid, Grayson Hall, Kathryn Leigh Scott, David Henesy, Roger Davis
Language: English
Country: United States
Specs: 97 mins. / Color / OAR 1.85.1 / MPAA Rating: PG
Rating: ★★★½
/ C+

Vampire Barnabas Collins, a member of an aristocratic family, returns from a long slumber, where he encounters a woman who resembles his long-lost love.  He embarks on a journey to find a cure for his curse, in order that he be allowed to live life as a human once again, and be reunited with his lover.

I’ve never seen an episode of the television show that this film was based upon. I’ve noticed that there are episodes available to stream on Hulu, and while I would like to go back and visit it at some point, having learned that it’s over 1200 episodes long, it is unlikely I’ll have much opportunity in my overworked life. Thus, going in, I knew little to nothing, as you’ve already seen in my opening paragraph, heading into today’s viewing. I eagerly sat down to see what the draw was to this long-running TV show and its 2 theatrical sequels. I was curious why it had spawned numerous books, games, television reboots, and other forms of merchandise.

Dark Shadows car

I’m happy to say that while I didn’t find the film a brilliant sortie into vampire fiction, I also didn’t find it deplorable. It was simply prosaic, lacking any nuances to justify a repeat viewing. Perhaps had I been familiar with the original series I may have gained more out of my viewing experience? I was a little confused as to who the characters were, and felt that they didn’t truly offer much exposition to clear my confusion.

The cinematography did stand out, as well as the sets and locale lending an air of authenticity. The spooks and blood also did play more like a film coming from Hammer Films than a 70s television sudser. However, the acting does come across like an extended episode of a soap opera, and is theatrical and over-the-top at moments.

House of Dark Shadows [1970]

The greatest thing that I experienced while watching the film was the desire to sacrifice some of my precious time set aside that I may catch up on other storied series to watch the original series. I also would like to watch the sequel, in the hopes that I may gain more clarification to the questions I had without resorting to 600+ hours and more searching for on googling. I’d actually love to hear what others who are familiar with the television show thought of the film, or if they believe it’s worth my time and effort to visit the original series.

Perhaps, as the Tootsie Owl once heard it said, the world [me] may never know. (That actually sounds like Elmo. Oy vey)

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 10: The House at the End of the Street

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 10: The House at the End of the Street

Every once in a while, I come across a film that stands so far above the competition, it belongs in a class of its own. The script is so eloquently woven it commands accolades and awards. The story takes the genre into new territory, creating an entire generation of copycat films due to its success. The acting is of a caliber scarcely spoken of outside of awards season, elevating the actors into a class observed by few in the world. The direction is stupendous, earning the auteur “a film by…” credit on each subsequent film. Scores of film lovers around the world clamor for a deluxe collector’s edition Blu-ray or DVD to adorn their massive shelving unit in their darkened home theater.

Today’s masterpiece….is none of those.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 10: The House at the End of the Street


Director: Mark Tonderai
Year: 2112
Cast: Jennifer Lawrence, Max Thieriot, Elisabeth Shue, Gil Bellows
Language: English
Country: United States
Specs: 101 mins. / Color / OAR 2.35.1 / MPAA Rating: PG-13
Rating: ★★ / D

A young girl and her estranged mother decide to move to a new home in the country to begin a path of healing for their broken relationship.  Learning that a horrible murder happened in the house across the way only complicates things, especially when all is not what it seems.

Within moments of the opening scene, I checked the menu of my television set to confirm that I hadn’t accidentally switched the input to MTV, or another music video channel. Once I realized that I indeed was watching Netflix, thanks in part to my realization that a music video hasn’t been played on MTV since I was a tyke, I knew I was in for an experience.

The opening scene begins with a crazed teen wandering the halls of her suburban home, hammer in hand, in order to slay her suspecting parents. Not UNSUSPECTING, but fully aware their daughter is a little this side of sane. Yet they both [SPOILER ALERT] allow themselves to defenselessly get pummeled to death by the half their size nutjob.

Lest I lead you to believe the script was the only problem, their death is confirmed when we see a low angle shot from below the bed they rest in of the feathers from their pillows and/or comforter shower the floor, followed by a steady amount of blood. John Woo this is not.

We also are priveledged to see such mesmerizing camera work, such as dolly, crane, shaky cam, dolly, shaky cam, crane, canted angle, birds eye POV, [good lord please stop, I’m getting sea sick], dolly, crane, dolly, crane…ugh. I felt like I’d mistakenly inserted into my video player one of my students horrible productions. How was it, I wondered, that the director was allowed to constantly use every movable camera trick in the book. I was nauseous.


Of course, it would all have been slightly excused had the dialogue fared any better.

For instance, in a early scene that takes place at a “parents aren’t home” party, a girl passes out [alcohol induced, no doubt]. The odd choice of direction aside [that being everything moving in slow motion then speedily ramped up into fast motion (called ramping) and tricky artistic edits and spinning bottles and (again I asked if this was a music video) flashing lights] Lawrence’s characters reaction and dialogue is comical.

In another scene, we are succumbed to such prose as:
“What happened to the body.” “They never found it.” “They think she’s still alive and living in the woods.” “WHAT!?!?!?!” as a reaction of utter horror and fear is on the characters face. Based on the complete lack of knowledge of anything at that point in the film for the character, its simply played for the audience and their prior knowledge. What tripe.

I honestly feel like I’ve already wasted enough time with watching the film and spending time to write this blog. I will wrap it up (something I wish the film had done 90 minutes sooner than it did) by stating how sad I was to see the caliber of talent on screen fail miserably in this film. It only must be a testament to the direction they were receiving. I don’t know how else to explain the cardboard performances and pain inducing dialogue.

Just to clarify, I nominate this film as definitely a must pass, even for fans of Lawrence and Shue.

 
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Posted by on October 10, 2013 in Movies

 

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31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 9: The Bay

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 9: The Bay

I spent a large part of my youth growing up in a coastal town famous for its boat marinas. As such, we had a boat docked in one of those marinas. My father used to take us out regularly far into the massive body of water to go swimming, fishing, or just plain relaxing. Other times he’d take us just around the bend from the marina, to a cove famous for its swimming holes. Sadly, much to the consternation of my stay-at-home mother, he would also often times leave the boat parked in the dock, and let us simply swim off the back of the boat. Looking back now as an adult, I see how foolish that may have been. Many other large cabin cruisers pulling in and out of the marina, filthy greasy film floating on the surface, the rainbow of colors reflecting in the hot summer sun. Even at that age I had moments of hesitation when my siblings were so blindly diving into the sludge from the rear of the cabin cruiser.


He also would let us fish, often gutting, cooking, and eating the fish within hours of our catch. To the dismay of my mother, his brother figured little better. He would take my cousin and I swimming in what was perhaps the most polluted river in the country, if not the state. There are many times I remember getting some bacterial fungal disease, which certainly came from the river, only to be told I likely was having an allergic reaction to some food I had not eaten.

Had I seen today’s film prior to my childhood, I am positive I would have lived an entirely different life.

31 Days of Films and Frights – Day 9: The Bay


Director: Barry Levinson
Year: 2012
Cast: Will Rogers, Kristen Connolly, Kether Donohue
Language: English
Country: United States
Specs: 84 mins. / Color / OAR N/A / MPAA Rating: R
Rating: ★★★★ / B

After a pair of divers mysteriously die in an apparent shark attack, a seemingly unconnected bacterial outbreak occurs in a small coastal town, causing disaster and panic in its wake.

I had briefly noticed today’s film when it was prominently displayed on my Apple TVs What’s New screen last year. When I had read the information about the film, I found it interesting that Barry Levinson (Rain Man, Wag the Dog, Good Morning Vietnam) had helmed this entry into the horror genre. He primarily has chosen films that are dramatic and/or political in tone. The reviews I read gave the film good marks, however, as is the case with more films than I care to admit, it slipped off my radar until preparing for this series of films for the month of October.

To cut to the chase, let me state that this is a film that I recommend all to see. Fans of other films that focus on an epidemic of mass proportions, such as Outbreak, Contagion, and 28 Days Later, will assuredly find this film to be enjoyable. For others, after watching the film, if you do not react in a way that causes you to take note, you perhaps have been swimming in the same waters as I did in my childhood a day too long. It’s a horror film, that is so eerily believable, that I couldn’t take my eyes off the screen. A found footage film yet again, and another that truly fits the medium.

I particularly found impressive Levinson’s use of multiple cameras to tell the story. Whereas most found footage pics focus on 1 camera that contains a tape of the incident that serves as the film, The Bay instead is composed of security cameras, ATM cameras, civilian cameras, traffic cameras, news crew cameras, and whatever other kind of video source that was “found” in the city that is affected. It is a clever twist on the found footage pic, and a welcome one at that.

There was ample amounts of gore, but it’s nothing you haven’t seen on an episode of ER, and not the kind you’ve seen in Saw. Be ready, if you have the stomach for it, to hit Google after you’ve watched this film, to see how much of the plot has been based in reality, and how much of it is Hollywood fiction. According to Levinson, during a screening on the films initial release, he stated that 85% of what is seen in the film is partially based on fact. Now that is SCARY!


The weakest element in the entire film is the character Donna, or rather Kether Donohue. She annoyingly licks her lips to moisturize them throughout the entire film. I couldn’t stop wishing someone would have simply thrown her a tube of lip balm, and gotten on with the show. It seemed more a nervous twitch of an amateur actress than it did a character trait she had developed (forgive me if I’m wrong). Also, there’s nothing here regarding cinematography, set pieces, music, or sound-effects for that matter. This is simply a character driven fear fest.

No ghosts, vampires, or extraterrestrial beings in this one. This is simply a matter of what you don’t see, in our real world, might kill you.

 
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Posted by on October 9, 2013 in Movies

 

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